Sunday, December 29, 2019

Marie Binet Soques, Double Black Widow – Frances, 1865


FULL TEXT: The Court of Assizes of the Garonne has just tried a woman named Souques, aged thirty, charged with having successively poisoned her two husbands, the first in 1863 and the second in March last. It appeared from the evidence given on the trial that the prisoner was married in 1855 to a blacksmith named Lacoste, and that they lived happily together for several years. In 1860, however, she formed an illicit connection with a man named Cazaux. The husband soon discovered his wife's infidelity, and did all he could to bring her back to her duty, but in vain. In 1863 Lacoste surprised his wife in company with Cazaux under under very suspicious circumstances, and in his fury he gave her a sound beating. About a month later the husband died after a short illness, and there was a general suspicion among the neighbours that he had been poisoned, but no inquiry was made into the cause of death. The prisoner then endeavoured to induce Cazaux to marry her, but as he refused she married a man named Souques in September last. For two months she con- ducted herself well, but before the end of the year she had renewed her connection with Cazaux, and from that time she and her husband lived on very bad terms. In March, Souques, who had always enjoyed good health, suddenly fell ill and died before the end of the month, with every appearance of having been poisoned. A post-mortem examination having shown such to be the case, the prisoner was arrested. Her first husband's body was also disinterred, but decom- position was too much advanced for the chemists to dis- cover traces of poison. With regard to the second husband the presence of poison was clearly proved. The jury accordingly found the prisoner guilty, but allowed her the benefit of extenuating circumstances, and the Court sentenced her to hard labour for life.

[“A Woman Charged With Poisoning Two Husbands.” The Leeds Mercury (England), Sep. 2, 1865, p. 8]

***

FULL TEXT (translated from French): This serious affair had aroused keen interest: also, as soon as the doors opened, a compact crowd, which an infantry picket barely contained, soon invaded the vast courtroom of the assize court. All eyes are on the accused, who appears to be about 30 years old, and who wears the modest clothing of peasant women from the South. She keeps her head constantly down, and when she is forced to lift it up, we can see her black and lively eyes, which indicate the energy and the resolution of her character.

A case, containing jars containing the main organs of the two victims, is among the exhibits.

Mr. the public prosecutor Léo Dupré occupies the seat of the public ministry, and Me Destours, lawyer of the bar of Toulouse, is in bench 1 of the defense.

Here are the main passages from the indictment:

“On July 3, 1855, Marie Binet contracted marriage with Jean Lacoste, who worked in the commune of Longages as a blacksmith. This union was at first happy; but Marie Binet's violent passions soon disturbed her. In the course of the year 1860, a criminal trade was established between her and Bernard Cazaux, who also lived in Longages, where he exercised the profession of wheelwright, and this culpable connection, to which the accused abandoned herself most daring cynicism, soon became the occasion for a distressing scandal.

“Jean Lacoste could not ignore his wife's misconduct for a long time. He forbade him to receive Cazaux; but she disregarded his defense, and responded with invective and threats to his legitimate complaints.

"Exasperated to see his authority disregarded, Lacoste allowed himself to be dragged several times into acts of violence against the accused, and these scenes, often repeated, gave rise to the sharpest irritation between the spouses.

“Around June 20, 1863, Lacoste caught his wife in the act. Under the influence of the just resentment he felt, he struck her violently. A few days later, he was seized with a sudden illness; the evil which had manifested itself after a meal prepared by the accused made rapid progress, and her walk soon presented all the symptoms of a perfectly characterized poisoning. Public opinion soon became alarmed, and the observations of the three doctors who were called to the patient justified all the alarms.

"The parish priest of Longages went to Lacoste, and the serious and extraordinary symptoms which he noticed also gave rise to suspicions of poisoning in his mind. Lacoste himself finally understood that he had been poisoned, and told several neighbors in the last days of his illness, and accused his wife of this crime in energetic and striking terms. Finally, on July 16, 1863, Lacoste died after horrible suffering.

However Marie Binet had achieved only part of the goal which she proposed: Rid of her husband, she made efforts to determine Cazaux to marry him; she could not succeed, and, under the influence of the violent spite which the refusals of this man made her feel, she contracted, on September 19, 1864, a second marriage with Mr. Bernard Souques.

“During the first two months, the new spouses lived in good harmony; but this happiness did not last long. Cazaux, who, at the time of the marriage, had discontented his relations with Marie Binet, soon resumed the course of his culpable assiduity, and we saw renewed all the scandals which had preceded the death of Sieur Lacoste.

"The multiplied and violent scenes which were the cause of the accused's bad behavior soon made him understand that the jealousy of Souques had become an obstacle for his adulterous relations with Cazaux. She therefore conceived the idea of ​​getting rid of her second husband with the help of a new crime.

"To ward off all suspicion and establish in advance the possibility of natural death, she took the precaution, as she had done for Mr. Lacoste, of spreading the false rumor that Souques was suffering from a chest infection, and that the doctors said he was going to die soon. This sad omen was soon realized: Souques, who usually enjoyed good health, gradually became ill, and his condition, like that of Lacoste, worsened following a very vivid scene that 'he had with the accused.

“Grim suspicions soon arose in his mind, and several witnesses heard him bitterly reproach his wife for having poisoned the food and herbal tea that she had served him; it even happened to him, in order to establish the legitimacy of his complaints, to offer those present to taste the suspected beverages; but Marie Binet hastened then, in order to avoid this dangerous test, to spread suspicious liquids on the ground.

"From March 27, Souques' disease worsened to the point where he was forced to keep the bed. Like Lacoste, he was seized with violent and frequent vomiting, accompanied by burning thirst and sharp pains which made him utter heartbreaking cries. Several times, when in these violent crises he asked to drink, his wife, instead of giving herbal tea or water, made him take wine.

“As at the time of Lacoste's disease, the doctors with the patient had suspicions of poisoning. The parish priest of Longages, who also went to Souques to administer the last sacraments to him, was so struck by the resemblance of the symptoms of this disease to those presented by Mr. Lacoste's condition, that he thought that a new crime had just been committed by Marie Binet, and that he could not refrain from showing her her deep indignation. Souques expired on April 1 in the most cruel suffering, and the public voice did not hesitate to make the accused responsible for this unexpected death. The justice was finally informed, and the investigation which was immediately opened did not take long to justify this serious accusation.

“Doctors were instructed to perform an autopsy on the body of Bernard Souques, and the lesions observed on the various organs led them to suppose the poisoning.

"In the presence of these findings, the exporter declared that the quantities of phosphate found in the organs are large enough to allow us to suspect poisoning by phosphorus from chemical matches, the end of which was impregnated with a colored phosphorus paste in red by lead oxide.

"From March 27, Souques' disease worsened to the point where he was forced to keep the bed. Like Lacoste, he was seized with violent and frequent vomiting, accompanied by burning thirst and sharp pains which made him utter heartbreaking cries. Several times, when in these violent crises he asked to drink, his wife, instead of giving herbal tea or water, made him take wine.

“As at the time of Lacoste's disease, the doctors with the patient had suspicions of poisoning. The parish priest of Longages, who also went to Souques to administer the last sacraments to him, was so struck by the resemblance of the symptoms of this disease to those presented by Mr. Lacoste's condition, that he thought that a new crime had just been committed by Marie Binet, and that he could not refrain from showing her her deep indignation. Souques expired on April 1 in the most cruel suffering, and the public voice did not hesitate to make the accused responsible for this unexpected death. The justice was finally informed, and the investigation which was immediately opened did not take long to justify this serious accusation.

“Doctors were instructed to perform an autopsy on the body of Bernard Souques, and the lesions observed on the various organs led them to suppose the poisoning.

"In the presence of these findings, the exporter declared that the quantities of phosphate 'found in the organs are large enough to allow us to suspect poisoning by phosphorus from chemical matches, the end of which was impregnated with a colored phosphorus paste in red by lead oxide.

In a warm argument, which lasted no less than four hours, Me Detours vigorously sought to drop all the charges, and the phosphorus having not been found in the free state in the organs of the victims , he argued that the existence of the offense body was by no means established.

President Blaja has shown talent and impartiality in summing up these long and important debates. His first words seemed to arouse great interest.

After an hour of deliberation, the jury reported an affirmative verdict on the two poisoning crimes, but tempered by the benefit of the extenuating circumstances.

The Court sentenced Marie Binet to forced labor for life. Pending this judgment, she showed no emotion, and the impassiveness which she had shown during the proceedings was not denied for a moment.

[“Courts And Tribunals - Court Of Assizes Of The Haute-Garonne. - Poisoning By A Woman On Her Two Paris. ”La Liberté (Paris, France), August 1865. P. 3]

***

FULL TEXT: Cette grave affaire avait excité un vif intérêt : aussi, dés l'ouverture des portes, une foule compacte, qu'un piquet d'infanterie a de la peine à contenir, a bientôt envahi la vaste salle d'audience de la cour d'assises. Tous es regards se dirigent sur l'accusée, qui parait âgée d environ 30 ans, et qui porte le modeste habillement des paysannes du Midi. Elle tient la tète constamment baissée, et quand elle est forcée de la relever, on aperçoit ses yeux noirs et vifs, qui indiquent l’énergie et la résolution de son caractère.

Une caisse, renfermant des bocaux contenant les principaux organes des deux victimes, figure parmi les pièces de conviction.

M. le procureur général Léo Dupré occupe le siège du ministère public, et Me Destours, avocat du barreau de Toulouse, est au banc 1 de la défense.

Voici les principaux passages de l'acte d'accusation :

« Le 3 juillet 1855, Marie Binet contracta mariage avec Jean Lacoste, qui exercait dans la commune de Longages la profession de forgeron. Cette union fut d'abord heureuse ; mais les violentes passions de Marie Binet ne tardèrent pas à la troubler. Dans le courant de l'année 1860, un commerce criminel s'établit entre elle et Bernard Cazaux, qui habitait aussi Longages, où il exerçait la profession de charron, et cette coupable liaison, à laquelle l'accusée s'abandonnai avec le plus audacieux cynisme, ne tarda pas à devenir l'occasion d'un affligeant scandale.

« Jean Lacoste ne put ignorer longtemps l'inconduite de sa femme. Il lui défendit de recevoir Cazaux; mais elle ne tint aucun compte de sa défense, et répondit par des invectives et des menaces à ses légitimes plaintes.

« Exaspéré de voir son autorité méconnue, Lacoste se laissa entraîner plusieurs fois à des actes de violence il l'égard de l'accusée, et ces scènes, souvent répétées, firent naître la plus vive irritation entre les époux.

« Vers le 20 juin 1863, Lacoste surprit sa femme en flagrant délit. Sous l'empire du juste ressentiment qu'il éprouvait, il la frappa violemment. Peu de jours après, il fut saisi d'une maladie soudaine; le mal, qui s était manifesté à la suite d'un repas apprêté par l'accusée, fit de rapides progrès, et sa marche présenta bientôt tous les symptômes d'un empoisonnement parfaitement caractérisé. L'opinion publique ne tarda pas à s'alarmer, et les observations des trois médecins qui furent appelés auprès du malade justifièrent toutes les alarmes.

« M. le curé de Longages se rendit auprès de Lacoste, et les symptômes graves et extraordinaires qu'il remarquait firent naître également dans son esprit des soupçons d'empoisonnement. Lacoste lui-même comprit enfin qu'il avait été empoisonné, et le dit à plusieurs voisins dans les derniers jours de sa maladie, et reproché ce crime à sa femme dans des termes énergiques et saisissants. Enfin, le 16 juillet 1863, Lacoste mourut après d'horribles souffrances.

Cependant Marie Binet n'avait atteint qu'une partie du but qu'elle se proposait: Débarrassée de son mari, elle fit des efforts pour dèterminer Cazaux à l'épouser; elle ne put y réussir, et, sous l'influence du violent dépit que les refus de cet homme lui firent ressentir, elle contracta, le 19 septembre 1864, un second mariage avec le sieur Bernard Souques.

« Pendant les deux premiers mois, les nouveaux époux vécurent en bonne intelligence; mais ce bonheur ne fut pas de longue durée. Cazaux, qui, au moment du mariage, avait discontiné ses relations avec Marie Binet, reprit bientôt le cours de sa coupable assiduité, et l'on vit se renouveler tous les scandales qui avaient précédé la mort du sieur Lacoste.

« Les scènes multipliées et violentes dont la mauvaise conduite de l'accusée était la cause ne tardèrent pas à lui faire comprendre que la jalousie de Souques était devenue un obstacle pour ses relations adultères avec Cazaux. Elle conçut dès lors la pensée de se débarrasser de son second mari à l'aide d'un nouveau crime.

« Pour éloigner tout soupçons et établir à l'avance la possibilité d'une mort naturelle, elle prit la précaution, comme elle l'avait fait pour le sieur Lacoste, de répandre le bruit mensonger que Souques était atteint d'une affection de poitrine, et que les médecins avaient déclaré qu'il devait bientôt mourir. Ce triste présage ne tarda pas à se réaliser : Souques, qui jouissait habituellement d'une bonne santé, devint peu à peu malade, et son état, comme celui de Lacoste, s'aggrava à la suite d'une scène très-vive qu'il eut avec l'accusée.

« De sinistres soupçons ne tardèrent pas à s'élever dans son esprit, et plusieurs témoins l'ont entendu reprocher amèrement à sa femme d'avoir empoisonné les aliments et la tisane qu'elle lui avait servis; il lui est même arrivé, afin de constater la légitimité de ses plaintes, d'offrir aux personnes présentes de goûter les breuvages soupçonnés ; mais Marie Binet s'empressait alors, afin d'éviter cette dangereuse épreuve, de répandre sur le sol les liquides suspects.

« A partir du 27 mars dernier,la maladie de Souques s'aggrava à tel point qu'il fut obligé de garder le lit. Comme Lacoste, il fut saisi de vomissements violents et fréquents, accompagnés d'une soif ardente et de douleurs aiguës qui lui faisaient pousser des cris déchirants. Plusieurs fois, lorsque dans ces crises violentes il demandait à boire, sa femme, au lieu de lui donner de la tisane ou de l'eau, lui fit prendre du vin.

« Comme à l'époque de la maladie de Lacoste, les médecins auprès du malade eurent des soupçons d'empoisonnement. Le curé de Longages qui se rendit également auprès de Souques pour lui administrer les derniers sacrements, fut tellement frappé de la ressemblance des symptômes de cette maladie avec ceux qu'avait présentés l'état du sieur Lacoste, qu'il eut la pensée qu'un nouveau crime venait d'être commis par Marie Binet, et qu'il ne put s'abstenir de manifester à cette dernière sa profonde indignation. Souques expira le 1er avril dans les plus cruelles souffrances, et la voix publique n'hésita pas à rendre l'accusée responsable de cette mort inattendue. La justice fut enfin informée, et l'instruction qui fut immédiatement ouverte ne tarda pas à justifier cette grave accusation.

« Des médecins furent chargés de procéder à l'autopsie du cadavre de Bernard Souques, et les lésions observées sur les divers organes les amenèrent à supposer l'empoisonnement.

« En présence de ces constatations, l'exporta déclaré que les quantités de phosphate 'trouvées dans les organes sont assez, fortes pour autoriser à soupçonner un empoisonnement par le phosphore provenant d'allumettes chimiques dont le bout était imprégné d'une pâte phosphorée colorée en rouge par l'oxyde de plomb.

« Ces conclusions de l'expert chimiste sont entièrement corroborées par les faits recueillis par l'instruction. Il a été, en effet, établi que, depuis le 6 mars jusqu'au 1er avril, époque de la mort de Souques, dîx-neuf paquets d'allumettes coloriées précisément en rouge ont été introduites dans la maison de ce dernier; que treize de ces paquets ent été achetés par Marie Billet, et que les dates de ces achats correspondent précisément aux jours pendant lesquels la maladie de Souques prit tout à coup un caractère alarmant.

« Plusieurs autres faits relevés par l'information démontrent aussi que ces allumettes ont dû être employées à empoisonner les breuvages qui ont été administrés au malade. »

Dans les divers interrogatoires qu'elle a subis, Marie Binet a protesté de son innocence, elle a osé même nier dans le premier moment ses relations avec Cazaux ; mais malgré ses protestations énergiques, sa culpabilité ne saurait être douteuse.

Une centaine de témoins à charge ont été entendus dans les deux premiers jours, et à l’audience du 12, M. le procureur général a prononcé un éloquent réquisitoire, qui a produit la plus grande sensation. En le terminant il a dit aux jurés:

Voilà, messieurs, toute l'affaire. Adultère et deux fois empoisonneuse, c'est ainsi que Marie Binet se présente devant vous. Vous lui épargnerez votre colère, mais vous lui refuserez votre pitié. Vous la devez tout entière à ses victimes. Je la livre à votre justice, et je me demande si votre justice pourra s'égaler à son crime. Je sais que si une loi qu'on appliquait autrefois, sous l'empire de laquelle nous ne vivons plus, la loi du talion, qui demandait œil pour œil, dent pour dent, régnait encore, vis-à-vis de Marie Minet elle serait impuissante, pujsquo cette femme, qui a deux fois donné la mort par le poison, ne pourrait y satisfaire qu'à moitié.

Dans une chaleureuse plaidoirie, qui n'a pas duré moins de quatre heures , Me Detours a énergiquement cherché à repousser toutes les charges de l'accusation, et le phosphore n'ayant pas été découvert à l'état libre dans les organes des victimes, il a soutenu que l'existence du corps de délit n'était nullement établie.

M. le président Blaja a fait preuve de talent et d'impartialité dans le résumé de ces longs et importants débats. Ses premières paroles ont paru exciter un vif intérêt.

Après une heure de délibération, le jury a rapporté un verdict affirmatif sur les deux crimes d'empoisonnement, mais tempéré par le bénéfice des circonstances atténuantes.

La Cour a condamné Marie Binet à la peine des travaux forcés à perpétuité. En attendant cet arrêt, elle n'a manifeste aucune émotion, et l'impassibilité dont elle avait fait preuve durant les débats ne s'est pas un seul instant démentie.

[“Cours Et Tribunaux - Cour D'assises De La Haute-Garonne. - Empoisonnement Par Une Femme Sur Ses Deux Paris.” La Liberté (Paris, France), Août 1865. P. 3]

***

***
 

For links to other cases of woman who murdered 2 or more husbands (or paramours), see Black Widow Serial Killers.

***

No comments:

Post a Comment