Sunday, September 18, 2011

Stana Ludushka: Serbian Black Widow Serial Killer - 1928


EXCERPT: Soon afterwards Lazar Ludushki, a wealthy peasant, died under similar circumstances a week later Mrs. Ludushki married another peasant from the same village. Within a few months a rich uncle of her second husband died under astonishingly similar circumstances and his lands were added to Stana Ludushka’s wealth. But this led to Mrs. Ludushka’s detention and an investigation by the authorities, and information she gave the police is alleged to have involved Anjuka.

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The source of this excerpt:

FULL TEXT: Vladimirorvac, Jugoslavia, July 10 – The arrest her of Anujka de Poshtonja, a 90-year-old Rumania [sic] woman who is charged with selling slow-acting poisonous mixtures during the last 50 years to married peasant women who wished to rid themselves of their husbands, has revealed a story of witchcraft and murder which recalls the dark days of the Middle Ages.

Anukka, who stoutly denies the charges, has been renounced and feared for half a century as a “witch” by the superstitious peasants in this district. She will soon be brought to trial with a number of other peasants alleged to be involved in the crimes.

The police charge that about 20 wealthy husbands have been mysteriously done away with in this district. The investigation in progress is declared by authorities to involve many prominent persons in this and nearby towns.

One of the most recent cases to attract attention was that of Gaja Marinkov, rich and wealthy proprietor of Banci, who was suddenly taken ill and died within a few days. Relatives who lived with him, and who benefitted by his will were accused by the police of poisoning him, but no trace of poison could be found.

Fearing foul play and suspecting Anujka, Gaja Marinkov’s eldest son told the police that he went to Anujka’s house and inquired discreetly whether she could supply a poison to kill off an old relative of his. Anujka, he said, asked how old he was and many similar questions, and finally said that for a great price she could supply something. The young man then pretended to doubt its efficiency to kill a healthy man and the old woman is declared have replied:

“If it was good enough to kill Gaja Marinkov it will do for anyone.”

Soon afterwards Lazar Ludushki, a wealthy peasant, died under similar circumstances a week later Mrs. Ludushki married another peasant from the same village. Within a few months a rich uncle of her second husband died under astonishingly similar circumstances and his lands were added to Stana Ludushka’s wealth. But this led to Mrs. Ludushka’s detention and an investigation by the authorities, and information she gave the police is alleged to have involved Anjuka.

When Anjuka was arrested she tried at first to frighten the young police sergeant who came to her, he reported.

“I work with the devil, young man,” she said. “If you imprison me you’ll remember it to your dying days. “Don’t play with the forces of evil.”

When accused of having sold poisons she protested that she had only supplied “magic water,” and claimed to have cured many people of ills by its use.

Investigations show that several of the richer peasants of Ilanci have died suddenly and mysteriously in the last few years.

[“Say Rumanian Woman Sold Poison To Kill Undesired Husbands – Police Claim Over 50 Wealthy Men Succumbed to Concoctions of ‘Witch.’” syndicated (AP), The Niagara Falls Gazette (N.Y.), Jul. 10, 1928, p. 7]

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For more cases of this type, see: Occult Female Serial Killers

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For more than two dozen similar cases, dating from 1658 to 2011, see the summary list with links see: The Husband-Killing Syndicates

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