Thursday, September 22, 2011

Catalina de los Ríos y Lisperguer, Chilean Serial Killer - 1660


Catalina de los Ríos y Lisperguer (Santiago de Chile, 1604 - 1665) was an aristocratic 17th century Chilean landowner, nicknamed “La Quintrala” because of her flaming red hair. During Chile's colonial period, she was noted for her extreme cruelty to her inquils (tenants), accused and tried for over 40 murders, becoming an icon of colonial abuse and oppression. She died in Santiago at the age of about 60. Her figure still lives in Chilean popular culture as the epitome of the perverse and abusive woman, as well as the oppression of Spanish rule. Catalina de los Ríos was of Spanish, German and Amerindian descent.

In 1622 Catalina’s sister accused her of murdering her father with poison contained in a serving of chicken. Though this was reported to the legal authority no charge was brought.

In 1633, Catalina attempted to murder Luis Vasquez, a clergyman who upbraided her for her cruelty. In the same year, Bishop Francisco Gonzalez de Salcedo told the Council of the Indies that Catalina had murdered her step-daughter by beating her to death. 

She was accused of murdering paramours, Enrique Enriquez, a Knight of Malta, and another, a Knight of Santiago. She also was suspected of ordering the assassination of a priest, of attempting to stab another who had visited her to redeem her soul.


In 1660 Catalina was arrested and brought to Santiago to face murder charges. 39 murders were investigated, resulting in charges for 14. She was sentenced to pay fines for her crimes.

In 1662 a new trial was initiated to try her for the murders of slaves. Catalina died on January 15, 1665 before the process was completed.

[Sources: Wikipedia in English and Spanish]

***


One incident in La Quintana’s career as a sociopath tops all others in its delusional self-obsession. She admired the masterfully carved large crucifix called Cristo de Mayo. Following the great Chilean earthquake of 1647 Catherine had the sculpture placed in her own home. Yet “her relationship with the crucifix was just as tempestuous as with the other men of her life. It is said that once she became furious because the crucified Jesus appeared to be staring accusingly at her provocative cleavage. She ordered the removal of the image claiming that no men in her house had the right to give her ‘funny looks.’”

[quote from: “The story of La Quintrala,” AllSantiago.com]

***

Photo source for “Cristo de Mayo”: Wikipedia Commons
By Kallme (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)]

***

***


***

***


***


***

For more cases, see: Women Who Like to Torture

***

1 comment:

  1. Misandry is very much present in our modern society

    ReplyDelete